Monthly Archives: July 2016

The Regency Senior Club: Tucson Seniors Can Soon Access a Vibrant Social Gathering Place

Regency Senior Club

Some of you may have seen our wonderful client, The Regency Senior Club,↗ profiled↗ in the Arizona Daily Star several months back. We’re proud to be providing the financing for the club’s new adult day healthcare center, currently under construction at Campbell Plaza, on the site of a former preschool.

Currently, only three centers offer care for seniors by the hour or by the day, leaving the market substantially underserved. The Regency Senior Club is well positioned to become the crown jewel of all such centers.

Regency is geared toward seniors who need individualized care. Clients will range from age 60 and up with dementia or other health issues.

The option to customize the amount of time a client spends at Regency is tremendously valuable to the seniors and their caregivers. Patrons can buy a membership or pay hourly, though members will have priority. Catered meals will be available, as will pampering, hygiene and some medical services.

The Regency Senior Club is the brainchild of Elaine Wozniak, a board-certified geriatric nurse practitioner who has had a house calls practice for 10 years and has worked in geriatrics for 20 years. She has also served as an associate professor at the University of Arizona’s College of Nursing. She first conceived of The Regency Senior Club when she visited her father at a similar facility in New Jersey.

“Besides having dementia, my father is remarkably healthy,” said Elaine, noting that he has no reason to give up an active lifestyle. “He’s a widower, and when he started going to his local adult daycare center, I saw an immediate and positive difference in his health.”

Citing research that has proven that certain activities can slow the progress of dementia, Elaine says activities at The Regency Senior Club will vary from games to arts and crafts to outings and even fine dining experiences (she has contracted with a caterer).

“Our clients who spend a full day with us will be treated to full, three-course plated meals with fine china and linens,” she explained. She also plans to encourage clients to change up their seat from meal to meal so that they’re sure to socialize with a range of different people.

She will stay abreast of the latest technology available to enhance the Regency Senior Club experience. Immediately upon opening, clients will have access to Beam,↗ a computer program installed in the ceiling that projects visual and mental games onto the floor or a table. Widely used in applications for children, Beam is treating The Regency Senior Club as a “beta site” to demonstrate its application for seniors as well. Attendees at The Regency Senior Club’s grand opening on August 1 will have a chance to try it out, too.

Full-time care for seniors will run $13.50 per hour and include a gourmet meal. For those attending five hours or less, the cost is $85 per day.

Elaine plans to provide support for caregivers too. “Caregiver burnout is huge,” she said, adding that she’s planning a caregiver support group led by herself and a social worker as well as outings and luncheons just for caregivers.

To house all of these wonderful activities, Elaine secured a 6,000-square-foot former daycare facility for The Regency Senior Club that is entirely fenced and secure. She is taking the interior down to the studs to reinvent the space. The Club will have seven activity rooms and a dedicated dining room. Seniors who are cognitively impaired will occupy separate areas of the club from seniors who are not.

We’re honored at Bank of Tucson to have provided the loan for the building renovation.

“Thank goodness for Bank of Tucson, because no one else wanted to fund a small business like mine,” Elaine said. “My first meeting with Mike Hannley lasted for two-and-a-half hours. When I left his office, he was a believer who recognized the enormous need for a club like mine. He’s been a strong financial and business supporter ever since and even started mentoring me.”

In addition to the activities and dining, seniors at The Regency Senior Club will also have access to a physical therapist assistant, and Elaine hopes to bring on a physical therapist soon. “I’ve had the great fortune of hand-picking my staff,” said Elaine. “The combination of the exposure The Regency Senior Club has had thus far, my longevity in the field of geriatric care and the regular business hours we’ll offer have allowed me to pick the cream of the crop for my staff.”

“We can’t wait for Elaine’s grand opening,” said Mike Hannley, president of Bank of Tucson. “Tucson is blessed to have a vibrant senior community, and we expect that The Regency Senior Club will provide a rich social experience for many of its members, as well as an invaluable resource for many caregivers.”

For Elaine, her journey toward opening The Regency Senior Club isn’t a job, it’s a passion fueled by her longtime affinity for working with seniors. It is also fueled by having seen how underserved seniors can be affected.

“People are living behind closed doors,” said Elaine. “We need to respect the elderly again; to give them something to look forward to.”

She likes to reference a quote she once saw: ‘broken crayons still color.’ We know that Elaine is the perfect person to release the rainbow that awaits clients of The Regency Senior Club. Keep your ears open for her grand opening and follow the club on Facebook↗ or Elaine on LinkedIn.↗

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Carmen Malsbury Joins Bank of Tucson

Carmen 6-16We’re happy to introduce you to our new team member, Carmen Malsbury. She joins us as an underwriter, with a career full of experience, and we are lucky to have found her. Through her diverse experience in banking, she understands the loan approval process very well, and the importance of taking into account a variety of factors beyond just numbers when evaluating loan applications.

Carmen was born and raised in Montana. After graduating from Montana State University, she taught first grade for three years and then decided to become a banker, following in her father’s footsteps. She started her career with First Bank Systems in Billings, Montana, where she worked as a commercial teller, consumer lender, commercial lender and credit administrator until moving to Seattle, Washington, with her husband. Her banking career in Seattle was also varied, including roles as a commercial lender and starting two new banks as the chief credit officer.

In 2014, she and her husband began to discuss retirement and where they would live. After a few trips to Tucson, they made the decision to sell their home and move south. The transition took over a year, with vacations spent working on their new house in Tucson. After finally making the move, Carmen decided that she wasn’t really ready to retire.

“I really didn’t know what to do with my time after I retired,” said Carmen. “I enjoyed setting up our new house and doing some hiking, but I wanted more of a purpose.”

She applied at Bank of Tucson, and the rest is history. She has her sense of purpose back and is enjoying getting to know her coworkers and the Bank of Tucson clients.

“I love the customer base at Bank of Tucson. When you work with small businesses, you have a chance to know the owners and to get to know more about their companies.”

Outside of work, Carmen and her husband enjoy spending time with their grandkids (even though they currently live in London), hiking, playing golf and wine tasting.

“Coming from Seattle, I’m especially enjoying the warmth and sunshine,” she said, “as well as how welcoming everyone at Bank has Tucson has been.”

Providing the right team of experts to help our clients succeed is very important to us, so we’re pleased to add Carmen to our team.

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Happy Independence Day

4th of july banner

In observance of our nation’s birthday, we wish everyone a happy 4th of July.

In honor of the holiday, we’d like to share some history about the American flag with you from usa-flag-site.org↗:

On January 1, 1776, the Continental Army was reorganized in accordance with a Congressional resolution which placed American forces under George Washington’s control. On that New Year’s Day the Continental Army was laying siege to Boston which had been taken over by the British Army. Washington ordered the Grand Union flag hoisted above his base at Prospect Hill. It had 13 alternate red and white stripes and the British Union Jack in the upper left-hand corner (the canton).

In May of 1776, Betsy Ross reported that she sewed the first American flag.

On June 14, 1777, in order to establish an official flag for the new nation, the Continental Congress passed the first Flag Act: “Resolved, That the flag of the United States be made of thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation.”

Between 1777 and 1960, Congress passed several acts that changed the shape, design and arrangement of the flag and allowed for additional stars and stripes to be added to reflect the admission of each new state.

  • Act of January 13, 1794 – provided for 15 stripes and 15 stars after May 1795.
  • Act of April 4, 1818 – provided for 13 stripes and one star for each state, to be added to the flag on the 4th of July following the admission of each new state, signed by President Monroe.
  • Executive Order of President Taft dated June 24, 1912 – established proportions of the flag and provided for arrangement of the stars in six horizontal rows of eight each, a single point of each star to be upward.
  • Executive Order of President Eisenhower dated January 3, 1959 – provided for the arrangement of the stars in seven rows of seven stars each, staggered horizontally and vertically.
  • Executive Order of President Eisenhower dated August 21, 1959 – provided for the arrangement of the stars in nine rows of stars staggered horizontally and eleven rows of stars staggered vertically.

Today the flag consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with 6 white. The stripes represent the original 13 colonies, the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well: Red symbolizes Hardiness and Valor, White symbolizes Purity and Innocence and Blue represents Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice.

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